The History of Fiddling in Northern Alberta to 1950

Beginning in the 1920s, radio became another means for Alberta fiddlers to learn tunes. Radio gave Alberta fiddlers immediate access to sounds from distant places, such as eastern Canada (Don Messer), the United States (Grand Ole Opry), and Alberta itself (Calgary Old-Timers). The advent of radio meant that Alberta fiddlers were increasingly exposed to a common body of tunes. Not everyone took to radio immediately, however.
Warning: file_get_contents(http://www.fwalive.ualberta.ca/vmctm_api/get_comment/type=nar&id=7&sec=13) [function.file-get-contents]: failed to open stream: HTTP request failed! HTTP/1.1 403 Forbidden in /home/chinook/public_html/services/CommentXML.php on line 12

Comments (0)

Comments and media are moderated and published according to our submission guidelines. The Virtual Museum of Canadian Traditional Music does not necessarily endorse the views expressed.
Go to page 13 14 of 22 Go to page 15

Click media for info.

Frank Madsen's old Viking radio

Frank Madsen's old Viking radio

Listen to audio: Warning: filesize() [function.filesize]: stat failed for http://www.fwalive.ualberta.ca/vmctm_media/NAFC/NAFC_Clips/NAFC_H-16-4.mp3 in /home/chinook/public_html/html/narratives.php on line 329
onclick="launchPopupWarning('?filepath=http://www.fwalive.ualberta.ca/vmctm_media/NAFC/NAFC_Clips/NAFC_H-16-4.mp3', '0audio'); return false">High | Low