The History of Fiddling in Northern Alberta to 1950

Most of the NAFP fiddlers grew up in rural Alberta during the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s. In the 1940s, rural conditions in Northern Alberta remained essentially as they had been since the 1890s. Travel was often by horse, and the schoolhouse was an important site for community dances. In spite of access to sheet music, radio, and recordings, for many NAFP fiddlers, local fiddling was still the strongest influence, because it was a source of entertainment.

It was at community dances that many of the NAFP fiddlers acquired their lifelong love of fiddle music and were given their first opportunities to play.


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Leroy Brown playing at the Belvedere Hall, a former one-room...

Leroy Brown playing at the Belvedere Hall, a former one-room schoolhouse

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Emile Kryvenchuk talks about how he liked to watch other fid...

Emile Kryvenchuk talks about how he liked to watch other fiddlers play.