The History of Fiddling in Northern Alberta to 1950

Immigration from Scandinavia also began in the late nineteenth century. The schottische, a favourite Norwegian dance, and many Norwegian, Swedish, and Finnish tunes that entered the fiddling repertoire in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries are still widely played in Northern Alberta.

Members of Rod Olstad's family settled in the Camrose area in 1893. Like many early Norwegian homesteaders, they migrated from Minnesota and the Dakotas where they had settled first.


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Clarence Knutson and his son playing together

Clarence Knutson and his son playing together

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Alfie and Byron Mhyre play Life in the Finland Woods.

Alfie and Byron Mhyre play Life in the Finland Woods.

Rod talks about his Norwegian roots.

Rod talks about his Norwegian roots.