The History of Fiddling in Northern Alberta to 1950

Many of the new immigrants came as homesteaders, enticed by the Canadian government's offer of "free" land. As they settled the land, they began to build houses, barns, and schools. In rural Alberta, these buildings became favourite sites for the community gatherings and dances that NAFP fiddlers remember so well.
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Wally Heppner playing the fiddle

Wally Heppner playing the fiddle

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A barn at the University of Alberta

A barn at the University of Alberta

Jiggs and Kay Carter talk about going by horse to house part...

Jiggs and Kay Carter talk about going by horse to house parties.